Time is Crucial in Stroke Recovery

Find out if NeuroAiD™ is right for you

Stroke is the first cause of acquired disability in the world

A stroke, brain attack, or a Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA), is the sudden death of brain cells caused by a lack of supply in oxygen to the brain. There are two main types of stroke:

  • Ischemic strokes or cerebral infarcts (80% of strokes) result from a blockage or a reduction of blood flow in an artery that irrigates the brain. They are caused either by a blood clot (thrombus) which blocks the blood vessel or by the buildup of plaque (often due to cholesterol) within the arteries which narrows vessels resulting in a loss of blood flow.
  • Haemorrhagic strokes are due to the rupture of an artery within the brain triggering an intracerebral haemorrhage (15% of strokes) or to the rupture of an aneurysm (arteriovenous malformation) entailing subarachnoid haemorrhage (5% of strokes).

What are the consequences of a stroke?

Resulting disabilities will vary depending on stroke location and severity.

After a stroke, brain cells die in the affected areas resulting to damaged or even lose neurons. Patients will often suffer physical disabilities such as partial loss of motricity or hemiplegia, sensory loss, language disorders, aphasia, visual disorders, and even memory loss. Level of recovery will vary from patient to patient. Starting rapidly a rehabilitation program is key to recovery.

Is there anything to boost recovery?

NeuroAiD™ is a recovery stimulator dedicated to support neurological functions*.

NeuroAiD™ recovery stimulator has been shown to increase the production of new neurons in the brain and supports the formation of new connections. The effects of this favorable brain environment have been shown to improve the outcome of recovery in clinical trials: patients on NeuroAiD™ have a 2.4 times higher chance of reaching independence**.

Find out if NeuroAiD™ is right for you

* This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease.
** Clinical study published in peer reviewed journal “Stroke”. Reference: Stroke. 2009 Mar;40(3):859-63.